ASIA10001 Language and Power in Asian Societies Second Essay 2018


ASIA10001 Language and Power in Asian Societies Second Essay 2018
DUE: 5 June

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Choose one of the 8 topics listed below for your second essay.
The books listed are all on overnight reserve and you will find appropriate sources among them. In order to prevent the problem of find resources there is not a requirement of using specific books for specific questions, however please do the following:
• Include at least five academic resources in your references (eg not web sites, newspapers, etc), of which at least two should be from this list (and they should be appropriate ones of course!)
• You are encouraged to include more resources than that. Readings for class, books and journal articles that you find in bibliographies of these readings or from library searches are all valuable resources. Better essays tend to have larger reference lists.
• Cite all your sources in the body of your essay (footnotes or in-text) and list all cited sources (and only cited sources) under “References” at the end of the essay.
Your essay must be:
• Double spaced, 2000 words
• Electronic copy submitted Online via the class LMS
(You may find it helpful to read the relevant chapters on specific Asian countries in
Andrew Simpson’s Language and National Identity in Asia [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007 – available as an e-book through the library] before starting your essay. This is especially true for essays involving comparisons between countries.)
1. Discuss ways in which people can use different language varieties (different registers, different dialects, different languages) to achieve their personal or political goals. Use examples form Indonesian society/societies as the context for your discussion
2. How do local language cultures in Indonesia (such as Javanese language culture) interact with the national language – Bahasa Indonesia? How do local language practices – such as Javanese politeness practices – express themselves in everyday life and in domains such as the media, and how does this connect with the national language (Indonesian)?
3. How was the emergence of Indonesian as a national language been affected by colonialism and nationalism? How has the Indonesian language ben consolidated as a language of national identity since the independence of the country in the 1940s? You can choose to look at this from a combination of different historical, political and/or social perspectives.
4. What effect have different kinds of power structures – political, religious, social or cultural – had on Arabic? (You can compare the situation before modern times (c.1800) with the modern era (after 1800) or you can look solely at modern times. Because this question is particularly open-ended, you should discuss your approach with Tim or Nick before you get too far into it.)
5. What effect have different kinds of power structures – political, religious, social or cultural – had on the language use in Iran? (You can look at change historically over time or you can look solely at the contemporary situation. Because this question is particularly open-ended, you should discuss your approach with Tim or Nick before you get too far into it.)
6. What forces can motivate a community to shift from a local indigenous language to a dominant language as their primary means of communication? In what ways have communities worked to counter these forces or to otherwise maintain language vitality? Compare the situations in two or three communities in different parts of the Asia-Pacific region.

 

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Simply Click ORDER NOW and fill your paper details. Our support team will review the assignment(s) and assign the right expert whose specialization is same to yours to complete it within your deadline. Our Editor(s) will then review the completed paper (to ensure that it is answered accordingly) before we email you a complete paper
REFERENCES
Abas, Husen. Indonesian as a unifying language of wider communication: a historical and sociolinguistic perspective.
UniM Baill Res 499.221 ABAS
Alisyahbana, S. Takdir. 1962. Indonesian language and literature: two essays. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University, Southeast Asia Studies.
UniM Baill Res 499.221 ALIS
Anderson, Benedict R. O’G. Imagined communities: reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism.
UniM Baill Res 320.54
Anderson, Benedict R. O’G. Language and power: exploring political cultures in Indonesia.
UniM Baill Res 306.209598
Anwar, Khaidir. 1990. Indonesian: the development and use of a national language. Yogyakarta: Gadjah Mada University Press.
UniM Baill Res 499.221 ANWA
Ashraf, Ahmad. “Iranian Identity, iv. 19th-20th Centuries”. Encyclopedia Iranica. Online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/iranian-identity-iv-19th-20th-centuries
Beeman, William. 1986. Language, Status and Power in Iran. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
UniM Bail 491.55019 BEEM
Berman, Laine 1998. Speaking through the silence: narratives, social conventions, and power in Java. New York : Oxford University Press.
UniM Baill Res 306.445982 BERM
Djenar, Dwi Noverini, Michael C Ewing and Howard Manns. 2018. Style and intersubjectivity in youth interaction.
Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.
UniM INTERNET resource
Errington, J. Joseph. 1998. Shifting languages: interaction and identity in Javanese Indonesia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
UniM Baill Res 499.222 ERRI
Errington, Joseph. 2014. “In search of Middle Indonesian: Linguistic dynamics in a provincial town.” In Search of Middle Indonesia, 199. In Van Klinken, Gerry, and Ward Berenschot (eds.) In search of middle Indonesia: middle classes in provincial towns, 199-219. Leiden: Brill.
Geertz, Clifford. 1960. The religion of Java. New York : Free Press. CHAPTER 17 ‘The Background and General Dimensions of Prijaji Belief and Etiquette’.
UniM Baill Res Q2173 TWO HOUR LOAN
Goebel, Zane. 2008. Language, class, and ethnicity in Indonesia. Bijdragen tot de taal-, land-en volkenkunde 164.1: 69-101.
Goebel, Zane. 2010. Language, migration, and identity: Neighborhood talk in Indonesia. Cambridge University Press.
Goebel, Zane. 2015. Language and superdiversity: Indonesians knowledging at home and abroad. Oxford University Press.
Heryanto, Ariel. 1995. Language of development and development of language: the case of Indonesia. Canberra : Australian National University, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Dept. of Linguistics.
UniM Baill Res 499 PACI v.86
Kassab, Elizabeth. Contemporary Arab Thought: Cultural Critique in Comparitive Perspective.
UniM Bail 909.097492708 KASS
Keeler, Ward. 1987. Javanese shadow plays, Javanese selves. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press.
UniM Baill Res 791.5 KEEL
Maier, H. M. J. 1993. ‘From heteroglossia to polyglossia: The creation of Malay and Dutch in the Indies’, Indonesia 56:37-65.
Marszałek-Kowalewska, Katarzyna. 2011. “Iranian language policy: a case of linguistic purism”. Online: http://www.staff.amu.edu.pl/~inveling/pdf/Marszalek-Kowalewska%20_22.pdf
Modarresi, Yahya. 2001. Aspects of sociolinguistics in Iran International Journal of the Sociology of Language 148:
Muliono, Anton M. 1985. Language development and cultivation: alternative approaches in language planning.
UniM Baill Res 401 MULI
Musgrave, Simon. 2014. Language shift and language maintenance in Indonesia. In Tupas, Ruanni and Peter Sercombe (eds), Language, Education and Nation-building: Assimilation and Shift in Southeast Asia, 87-105. Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan.
Perry, John. 1985. “Language Reform in Turkey and Iran.” International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 17, 295-311. Online:
Online: http://nelc.uchicago.edu/sites/nelc.uchicago.edu/files/Perry19852003%20LangRef-Turkey&Iran.pdf
Sen, Krishna and David Hill. 2000. Media, culture and politics in Indonesia. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
UniM Baill Res 302.2309598 SEN
Siegel, James T. 1986. Solo in the new order: language and hierarchy in an Indonesian city. Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1986.
UniM Baill Res 401.909598 SIEG
Simpson, Andrew. 2007. Language and national identity in Asia. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Online source.
Rouchdy, Aleya, ed. 2013. Language contact and language conflict in Arabic. Routledge.
Sadeghi, Ali Ashraf. 2001. “Language planning in Iran: A historical review.” International Journal of the Sociology of Language 148: pp. 19-30.
Sneddon, James N. The Indonesian language: Its history and role in modern society. Sydney: UNSW Press, 2003.
Suleiman, Yasir. 2013. Arabic sociolinguistics: Issues and perspectives. Routledge, 2013.
UniM Bail 306.44089927 ARAB
Suleiman, Yasir. 2003. The Arabic Language and National Identity. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Suleiman, Yasir. 1994. “Nationalism and the Arabic Language: an historical overview”. In Yasir Suleiman (ed.) Arabic Sociolinguistics: Issues and Perspectives. Surrey: Curzon Press.
Windfuhr, Gernot (ed.) 2009. The Iranian languages. London: Routledge.
UniM Bail 491.5 IRAN AVAILABLE
Zentz, Lauren. 2015. “Love” the Local, “Use” the National, “Study” the Foreign: Shifting Javanese Language Ecologies in (Post-)Modernity, Postcoloniality, and Globalization. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, Vol. 24, Issue 3, pp. 339–359.

 

To get your Assignment/Homework solutions;

Simply Click ORDER NOW and fill your paper details. Our support team will review the assignment(s) and assign the right expert whose specialization is same to yours to complete it within your deadline. Our Editor(s) will then review the completed paper (to ensure that it is answered accordingly) before we email you a complete paper

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